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Talking Multimedia in Education

As posted in Educational Vignettes  one of the investments in our Strategic Learning Environment(SLE) is about using multimedia to support and better our teaching and learning practices at City University London. This post looks at how multimedia has evolved in Education. This is combined with a quick look at some of the external and internal case studies on using multimedia in teaching. This post will also include a look at the recommendations that the Multimedia Requirements Working group are considering which is based on an analysis of all the schools needs on this topic.

header_services_multimediaCity University has a good track record of enabling academic staff to use multimedia for learning since it is a key aspect of the Strategic Learning Environment (SLE).

Why use Multimedia in Education?

There has been an increase and change in the use of multimedia (video & audio) in learning, teaching and assessment in Higher Education the last few years. This is influenced by the experience of using web 2.0 services such as You Tube and iTunes, and increasing use of mobile devices in education. Educators and students have been inspired to make, share and learn from video and audio in new ways.  Other areas such as marketing, libraries and research are also increasing their use of multimedia.

For an interesting talk in how video is currently being used in education view Salman Khan at TEDTALKS. Common examples of uses of multimedia (as researched by JISC Digital) include:

  • demonstrations of contextual images;
  • images with clickable parts (an image map) that link to further information e.g. Google maps;
  • video recordings of teaching sessions; to produce media-enhanced feedback;
  • recordings of special events such as guest lecturers.

External research on Multimedia

A useful framework to support educators in terms of how to use digital resources (artefacts) has been inspired by a JISC project. The DiAL-e Framework supports the pedagogically effective use of a range of digital content, focusing on what the learner does with an artefact rather than giving priority to its subject or discipline content.

So what’s the latest at City?

Demand for video is increasing, in particular for assessment in the form of coursework submission and reflective portfolios and as well as enabling staff and students to make their own video content.

For a look at some of the case studies around using multimedia you may be interested in the online webinars (run by the Video Special Interest Group). A recent webinar contained a diverse use of multimedia to suit the programmes in three schools. These were:

  • Sophie Paluch (The City Law School) has created mock courtroom scenarios for retraining judges across the UK. These videos enable the practice of representing someone in court as an advocate on the programme.
  • Natasa Perovic (School of Health) has created resources on blood pressure stethoscope sounds as the programme wanted a resource that made it easier for students to recognise the different sounds. The videos were for students who weren’t experienced in measuring blood pressure.
  • Luis Balseca (CASS) is running a pilot on video assessment for students which are being submitted through Moodle for one of the MBA programmes.

The session has been recorded and will be submitted in a vignette in due course.

Schools and their Requirements

All schools recently took part in a requirements gathering exercise in summer 2012. Four themes emerged that describe the direction that City University London expects in the tools or features used most frequently.

Features in relation to the four themes:

1. Help staff and students easily make and share multimedia recordings.

  • An easy to use online workflow with compression and creation of assets that will be compatible on all devices and platforms.
  •  A web cam and a screen capture feature, which is automatically saved to the library.

2. Enable sharing of audio & video material created at the University.

  • A ‘you tube’ like browse-able public and private and administration interface
  •  A library that can be searched from within Moodle

3. Provide a safe and controlled place to store and publish audio & video, so access can be restricted to suit different needs, e.g. confidential subject matter, assessment pieces, student presentations, copyrighted materials and television recordings.

  •     Secure Moodle assignment integration
  •     Very large files can be submitted and handle in batches
  •     Private reflective portfolios for students

4. Take learning, teaching and assessment using audio & video further i.e. to a global, mobile generation and enhance the power of social media tools.

  •     Users can record and upload via mobile devices
  •     Basic editing can be online
  •     Allows users to build playlists and make favourites

With Moodle 2 due to be released to students in September 2013, the Multimedia requirements group are looking at ways in which multimedia can be integrated effectively with Moodle at course and assessment level. Do stay tuned for the next update, and in the meantime if you’d like to be find out about how to use multimedia to suit your programmes, please do contact your educational technology team.

 

 

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